Author Topic: I can't hear what carers say. Fed up of having to ask them to repeat themselves.  (Read 1716 times)

Yvette

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Although it is in my Care Plan  that I am partially deaf, carers don't take it on board whatsoever.

I am designing a poster to laminate and stick to the hall door (and a spare one on a kitchen cupboard).

What do others think?  Can I add to it or improve it?

Quote
I AM PARTIALLY DEAF

So if you wish to talk to yourself:

Talk to me in a low voice or mumble.

Talk to me from behind me. 

Talk to me when you are at the kitchen sink and I am sitting at the computer.

Talk to me from a different room.

Talk to me from upstairs.

Talk to me from the landing while I am in the shower.

Talk to me when I am looking in the fridge, freezer or a cupboard.

lankou

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Sunny Clouds

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I like it.  However, I've got the sort of sense of humour that would take to it.  Do your carers?

If they do, it's great; if they're po-faced, maybe you could try something slightly different?  Here's a preliminary suggestion you might want to play with.  If you don't like it, it will at least clarify for you how you do or don't want your notice to come across.

Note that it's all phrased positively to engender a positive response.  In your shoes, I'd love to put up a notice saying "listen, carers, I can't ruddy well hear you - do you want to keep your jobs or  not?" but it's perhaps not best staff management.

My deafness - how to help

(Guidelines as requested.)

Come into the same room to talk

Come close to me to talk

Attract my attention before you start talking

Face me so I can lipread you

Talk loudly without shouting

Also, if you've got any practical ways that look like you're trying to help them, maybe that would box them into feeling obliged to use them.  I grew up with a dinner bell (big, old fashioned handbell, like a playground bell) and it produces a surprising volume of noise.  You could also experiment with things like using remote doorbells indoors.  E.g. they press the bellpush upstairs which makes the strobe flash downstairs to let you know they've got the bath ready.  You get the gist.

It shouldn't be you that has to make all this effort.  You're the reason they have their jobs.  However, there are only three options.  One, ignore them.  Two get ratty.  Three get manipulative.  The first is ok short term, not longer term.  The second only works if you do have the power and flexibility to sack them very easily and replace them very easily.  The third works but I find it the hardest approach in most contexts. 

I believe, though, that sounding positive gets those that either hadn't thought or feel it's too much effort to see it as simple and go with it, and boxes those that are bloody-minded into a corner where if they don't comply, you can then go through whatever procedures there are there to get rid of them.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

oldtone27

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I agree with Sunny here. Unless you are sure of your carers' response to your original notice it could be misinterpreted as sarcastic and upset people. Not a good management technique.

I would try Sunny's solution first with yours as a fall back.

I did like Iankou's slightly self deprecating picture and that might work well alongside Sunny's notice. It would draw their attention and lighten the mood.

Monic1511

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Hi Yvette

I would go with Sunny's one first - I might re order them though

My deafness - how to help

(Guidelines as requested.)
Attract my attention before you start talking

Come into the same room to talk

Face me so I can lipread you

Talk loudly without shouting

Otherwise you will end up talking to yourself and becoming frustrated at what you perceive to be rudeness where I'm unaware your even talking at me.
Notice the "at"  if you want to talk "to" me please make sure I know your actually speaking.
Good luck
Monic

Yvette

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Thank you all so much.  >thumbsup<

I've come up with this:

Quote
I AM PARTIALLY DEAF

How to help:

Attract my attention before you start talking

Come close to me to talk

Face me so I can lipread what you are saying

Sunny Clouds

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I reckon that's just what's needed.  Very succinct.  I bet it'll work!
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)