Work good for your health, Iain Duncan Smith to say as welfare reforms unveiled

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lankou

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I looked to see what the Royal College of Psychiatrists' views are on mental illness and work.


Have you a link for that please.

JLR2

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>ufo<

By the logic of IDS / Unum, the old age pension could be abolished to (allegedly) improve health.

Likewise ending all benefit entitlements going on this idea of IDS's would see a rapid return to full employment no doubt.

Offworld

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Always suspected the old 'left' demand for "the right to work" would end up as a case of beware of getting what you (thought you) ask for.
Wonder how long before IDS cites the UN on that, and praises himself for seeking to allegedly protecting the public against unemployment .... but a right to not be coerced into "work" as forced-labour might be of more relevance nowadays, though those who rule certainly wouldn't be interested in it.

For Unum to be unchallenged in its assertion that (officially designated) "work" is a theraputic cure for almost all ailments is worrying. All the more so since IDS is -- with NuLab support -- actively applying these dogmas, which reduce what were formerly known as "people", into disposable units of production and consumption --  justification for the very existence of whom is entirely encapsulated within a transitory job-description.
Pity that medical/professional bodies nowadays seem to just tag on rather bland qualifiers or warnings (which the likes of IDS will of course ignore) as if that rather wimpish waiver could negate the potential horrors of what they otherwise can be selectively quoted as endorsing -- ie. Unum doctrine.
Could it be that most are happy to stuff their own pockets, don't really give a damn, and any 'qualifier' platitude is just them covering their own bought butts against future recrimination?

So, a secularised version of what used to be the religiously moralistic adulation of "work" -- workers bask in the virtuously vapourware reward, while bosses and the ruling elite extract the material and monetary rewards.
All things bright and beautiful.

Given the prevalence of such unthinking cultism,  it's little wonder that economic/social discussion is bogged down within the parameters of a set of economic and technological conditions, assertions and assumptions which became obsolete long ago.
From working-time and age considerations, to the debt-driven imperative for perpetual growth, to the warped economic and psychological dependencies that allow the present system to continue its impose its own dysfunctionality (except from the perspective of an ever richer 1% and their apparatchiks, who have a vested interest in its continuation) .... all soon to be nailed onto international and national law by imposition of "treaties" such as the TTIP.
Mostly relics of the 19th century..... where's the labour intensive, 'full-employment', non-automated production now?
Whether deliberately or because of incompetence, Bennett of the Greens may have done the public (everywhere) a great dis-service by scuttling her Party's version of Citizens Income in the recent election campaign.
A successful presentation of that could have forced the corporatist political establishment to finally admit that socio-economic alternatives are available, which are more in keeping with the 21st century.

 >confused<   Sorry if that's a boring ramble; perhaps  I really ought to try to stop thinking so much.

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Text of the speech is attached to this post as a .doc file  >attachment<

NeuralgicNeurotic

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