The inequality of incapacity

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NeuralgicNeurotic

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The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 31 Aug 2015 08:25AM
https://www.rethinkingincapacity.org/the-inequality-of-incapacity/#more-1529

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While many inequalities are extensively researched, particularly around income and health, it is perhaps surprising to still find other inequalities that are barely mentioned in the literature.  Yet this is true for one inequality around disability and work: almost no research focuses on why some people with disabilities are working and others are not, even when they have the same disabilities. What are the advantages that enable some – but only some, usually better-educated – sick and disabled people to stay attached to the labour market?


Some of the issues raised in the paper are addressed by Catherine Hale in this blog post:

http://limitedcapability.blogspot.co.uk/2015/08/inequality-in-incapacity-for-work.html?spref=tw

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Ben Baumberg’s latest paper is an excellent discussion of the real-world factors in the labour market that create disadvantage and lower the employment rates among disabled people.  As you could imagine, the nature of work, the degree of autonomy and flexibility, and choice in work all explain why some people are incapacitated for work by an impairment while others aren’t.

This analysis might seem to speak directly to Iain Duncan Smith’s recent speech about the false binary of fit/unfit for work. But this would be a mistaken conclusion to draw.

Sunshine

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 31 Aug 2015 02:19PM
Quite a lot to read but I got to the end :-)

The articles seem to be saying that impairment itself should not be the only criteria for determining if a person should be expected to work or not. That other factors should be looked at,

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A fair assessment process should judge distance from the labour market not just on health or impairment grounds alone but in terms of education, qualifications, previous experience and the choices in employment that they bring.

I think the labour market itself should also me part of the analysis. For example there may be work a sick disabled person could do on a regular basis where they can plan and adapt their life to include work eg when to take medication, things which zero hour contracts dont allow.

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 31 Aug 2015 02:20PM
Moved from News to talk so more people see it.  >thumbsup<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 31 Aug 2015 08:17PM
The research is based around such a small cohort (32) that I find it difficult to see it as meaningful, but it's an interesting starting point for discussion.

To some extent, part of it is what is known fairly widely, I think, in UK disability circles as variations on 'the Stephen Hawking effect'.   It's the one where people say he can't do anything except twitch one facial muscle and he holds down a full-time job etc.

And the come-back I've read on site after site is that he's got carers round the clock and not everyone can get that level of help.

But I think the premise of the research referred to in the OP may be wrong in another way.

The premise of the research appears to be that we should be dividing people into can work and can't work.  Well, that's what people think ESA is about, but actually it's based around limited capability for work.

The whole point of a benefit for LCW is that it includes both those that can't work and those that society in all fairness doesn't expect to find work or be able to do work, merely encourages and supports them to do so where possible, reasonable, realistic etc.

So I am very, very twitchy about arguments that re-inforce the 'they could work if only' concept to the extent that the logical corollery is that only people simply unable to do any work at all should end up on some equivalent of ESA.

That approach has the potential to be very, very damaging.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Yvette

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 31 Aug 2015 11:44PM
I had a very quick glance but couldn't do more than that - because it upsets me so much.  :-(

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 02 Sep 2015 12:52AM
 >bighugs<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 02 Sep 2015 02:39PM
Sorry Yvette >hugs<

Yvette

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Re: The inequality of incapacity

  • on: 02 Sep 2015 07:08PM
NN, thank you but please don't be sorry.  The facts are the facts. 

And thanks for the hugs SC.