might be of interest, not sure what to think

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Offworld

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http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/sep/04/depersonalisation-disorder-the-condition-youve-never-heard-of-that-affects-millions


 >erm-thinking<    No doubt if it was officially recognised nowadays, forced-labour would allegedly be the cure.

Sunny Clouds

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I'm not sure whether it's helpful to emphasis it as a separate disorder rather than is more commonly done, as a symptom or a facet of other disorders, including various personality disorders, PTSD etc.

Do people really want, in a social context, a label that seems to mean they can't tell good from bad?  I speak as someone with a cynicism and wariness as to the fads of diagnostic labels born of years in the psychiatric system.

By way of illustration of my attitude,  when I come across people who say that they  have a bipolar diagnosis but think that it is wrong and that what they really have is emotionally unstable personality disorder, I generally tell them that in my opinion, unless there is a service or treatment available to them locally that they want and that they can only get if they have an EUPD label, stick with the bipolar label for official purposes and just use their self-diagnosis to enable them to seek help and information outside the psychiatric system.  Why?  Because in my opinion, EUPD is the diagnosis from hell in terms of attitudes towards people with it, whereas a bipolar disorder diagnosis is more socially acceptable and attracts more kindness.  Who knows but that in five or fifty years time it may be the other way round.

I see psychiatric labels as being primarily about communication.  That comes from the linguist in me. 

Let me draw an analogy.

I am mother-tongue English, but don't only think in English, and if I see an owl, I don't see an 'owl', I see an 'hibou' or a 'chouette'.  Why?  Because the distinction between an hibou and a chouette is whether the owl has or hasn't got little tufty bits on its head that look like ears.  We can't draw that distinction in colloquial, everyday English, we'd have to use technical terms.  On the other hand, I find the German word Gluek very useful, because it encompasses both luck and happiness, and we can only do that in English by a phrase such as good fortune, which can sound a bit starchy or literary. 

So when we use psychiatric diagnoses, I think first and formost in terms of whether they're linguistically useful.

Right now, I feel very stressed.  I could give you a long saga of why, but everyone here would understand 'stressed'.  I'm alternating between frantically trying to deal with various simultaneous difficult situations and feeling like a rabbit in the headlights.  I'm snappy.  When I write or talk, I'm wordy.  I feel downhearted.  And so on.

If I were talking with my GP, I might say that I think that, on balance, it's probably some degree of dysphoric hypomania.  The terms would be useful.  But given that he appears to belong to that school of thought that would generally be called critical psychiatry (which I rather think is probably one factor in why he no longer works in psychiatry) he would probably be less hung up on whether that was the correct description technically and more on the implications for treatment.  He'd also probably be just as happy with the everyday description.

But when you emphasise a psychiatric label and category, it has lots of personal and social implications.

I would worry, therefore, if this diagnosis were to become popular, as it were, if then it were to become a target for hard-sell medication, or if it were to become the sort of diagnosis one definitely doesn't want.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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As I very often do, I totally agree with you sunny.

I've been taking tryptophan at night to help me sleep, having read about it and bought it via Amazon. I am definitely finding it helpful and a friend pondering why it's not available on prescription hypothesised that it's because it's not manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. 

Sunny Clouds

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If you've the energy to read it, you might agree with my little rant today about antipsychotics and mis-selling.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Yvette

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For anyone thinking of buying Tryptophan, please do read about the interactions with other medications and its side-effects first.

Quote
L-tryptophan is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It has been linked to over 1500 reports of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS) and 37 deaths. EMS is a neurological condition with symptoms that include fatigue; intense muscle pain; nerve pain; skin changes; baldness; rash; and pain and swelling affecting the joints, connective tissue, lungs, heart, and liver. Symptoms tend to improve over time, but some people may still experience symptoms up to 2 years after they develop EMS. Some people report that their symptoms have never gone away completely.

In 1990, L-tryptophan was recalled from the market due to these safety concerns. After the limitation of L-tryptophan products, the number of EMS cases dropped sharply. The exact cause of EMS in patients taking L-tryptophan is unknown, but some evidence suggests it may be due to contaminated L-tryptophan products. About 95% of all EMS cases were traced to L-tryptophan produced by a single manufacturer in Japan. Currently, under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994, L-tryptophan is available and marketed as a dietary supplement. 

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-326-l-tryptophan.aspx?activeingredientid=326&activeingredientname=l-tryptophan

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-326-l-tryptophan.aspx?activeingredientid=326&activeingredientname=l-tryptophan

Fiz

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Well, I've not had any of those symptoms, or no more than I normally do and it's definitely helping me sleep and I'm therefore coping better in the day and needing less other medication at night. I've just looked at where my tryptophan is made and it's made in California, USA. But I won't be buying more once this runs out, too expensive.